cholera

Epidemiological and Microbiological investigation of cholera outbreak in a marsh slum area of Lagos, South Western Nigeria, 2011.

Background: Cholera epidemics are common in Nigeria and cause high morbidity and mortality. In March, 2011, we investigated an outbreak of suspected cholera in Ajegunle – a marsh slum in Lagos State, Nigeria, to confirm the outbreak and institute control measures.

Year: 
2011
Author (s): 
A. Aman-Oloniyo, O. Fawole, P.Nguku, S. Idris, O. Biya , J. Idris, F. Olugbile, F. Taiwo, O. Bakare, A. Odor, G. Balogun, A. Oduneye, D. Modupe, A. Mbata

 

Presenter (s): 
Olawunmi Adeoye
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Conference: 
EIS International Night 2012

Rapid Response to a Cholera outbreak in Hodeidah governorate, Yemen 2010.

Introduction: Cholera remains a health problem in many parts of the word. Refugees, poverty, unsafe water supply and poor sanitation are an opportunity for spreading Vibrio cholera. Yemen’s proximity to the horn of Africa allows about 200-300 individuals to cross to Yemen daily, mainly through Hodeidah, on the red sea. This has resulted in spread of diseases to Yemen, including cholera. We investigated a cholera outbreak in Hodeidah in August 2010. This report summarizes the results of this investigation.

Year: 
2009
Author (s): 

Methaq Alsada Yemen (FETP)

Presenter (s): 
Al sada

An explosive outbreak of cholera in a shelter home for mentally retarded females, Howrah, West Bengal, India, 2010

Background: On 13th May 2010, a cluster of diarrhea cases was reported among female residents of a shelter home for mentally retarded, Per-bakshi village, Amta-II block in Howrah district, India. We investigated the outbreak to identify etiologic agent, source of infection and to propose recommendation.

Year: 
2009
Author (s): 

Subhransu S Datta, R. Ramachandran, M. V. Murhekar National Institute of Epidemiology, Indian Council of Medical Research, Chennai, India.

Presenter (s): 
Datta

Outbreak of Cholera among Workers of a Jute Mill in Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Background: On 10th March 2010, an outbreak of diarrheal disease was reported among workers of a jute mill in Kolkata, West Bengal, India. The cluster was investigated to identify the agent (s) and the source of infection and make recommendations.

Year: 
2008
Author (s): 

Prakash Mridha1, AK Biswas2, R. Ramakrishnan1, MV Murhekar1. 1 Field Epidemiology Training Programme (FETP), National Institute of Epidemiology, Chennai, India 2 Strategic Planning & Sector Reform Cell, Government of West Bengal, Department of Healt

Presenter (s): 
Mridha
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Contaminated stream water causes cholera in a village of hilly area -Kalahandi, Eastern India, 2009

Background: In August, 2009 a cluster of diarrhoea cases was reported in a rural hilly village of Kalahandi, Orissa, Eastern India. We investigated the cluster to identify risk factors and propose recommendations.

Year: 
2008
Author (s): 

Dasmohapatra S, Manickam P, Murhekar MV

Presenter (s): 
dasmohapatra

Outbreak of Cholera, East-Akim Municipality, Ghana, November, 2010

Background: Cholera is an acute infectious illness with profuse watery diarrhea caused by toxigenic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 or O139. World–wide, an estimated 3–5 million cholera cases with 100,000–120,000 deaths occur annually. In Ghana, over 9000 cholera-cases with 250 deaths were recorded in 1999. Provision of safe water and sanitation prevents cholera outbreaks. On October 29th 2010, the East-Akim Municipality (EAM) received a report of suspected cholera outbreak.

Year: 
2008
Author (s): 

Joseph Opare 1, 2, Der1, 2, K .Afakye1, G. Bonsu2 C. Ohuabunwo1, E. Afari1, S. Sackey1, F. Wurapa1, J.

Presenter (s): 
Opare
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Knowledge, attitudes and practices about cholera prevention in Santo Domingo during November-December, 2010: A risk communication campaign evaluation.

Introduction: In November 2010, following an outbreak of cholera in Haiti, the first cases of cholera in the Dominican Republic were identified in Santo Domingo. The Ministry of Health immediately launched a cholera prevention campaign. Three weeks later, we conducted a survey to evaluate knowledge, attitudes and practices about cholera prevention. Methods: We conducted a two-stage randomized cluster survey. We administered a questionnaire to each head of household and tested drinking water for residual chlorine. We defined households as poor using the National Statistics Office method of assets ownership. We calculated frequencies and odds ratios (OR) with 95%CIs accounting for clustering at the first sample stage. Results: We interviewed 480 heads-of-households (49% of households were poor, 0.2% only spoke Creole), of which 89% had received cholera prevention messages from ≥1 source (TV 81%, radio 41%, leaflets 13%, and newspapers 11%). Approximately half (54% [49%–60%]) knew that cholera is transmitted by eating uncooked food; one-third (33% [27%–40%]) knew about transmission through drinking untreated water. Prevention measures most frequently implemented were drinking only bottled water (85% [79%–90%]) and washing hands with soap (71% [67%–78%]). No residual chlorine was detected in 78% of households without bottled water. Poor households were less likely than non-poor households to drink bottled water (OR=0.5 [0.2 – 0.9]), wash hands with soap (OR=0.4 [0.2 – 0.7]), or have received prevention messages (OR=0.3 [0.2 – 0.5]). Conclusion: While the cholera prevention campaign reached many households in the capital, knowledge of risk factors remained low. Nevertheless, many households were implementing measures to reduce cholera risk. Additional messaging is needed, possibly informed by qualitative investigations, and targeted at poorer households. Key words: cholera, risk communication, socioeconomic status.

Year: 
2007
Author (s): 

Yira Tavarez, Leonel Lerebours, Julie Harris, Percy Minaya, Luis Bonilla, Oliver Morgan, Raquel Pimentel.

Presenter (s): 
Tavarez
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Investigation of an outbreak of Cholera in Sae Saboua (District of Guidan-Roumji - Maradi) _ Niger _ August 2010

Background: Cholera is a very contagious infectious disease due to Vibrio cholerae. An estimated 3-5 million cases and over 100,000 deaths occur annually worldwide. In August 2010, suspicious cases of gastroenteritis were notified in the district of Guidan-Roumji and Nine (9) cases were recorded in the health center of Saé Saboua . Therefore, an investigation was conducted with the objective of describing the epidemic, determining the causal agent, and setting control and preventive measures.

Year: 
2010
Author (s): 

Sidikou Fati 1,3, Ousman Sanda2, Ibrahim Alkassoum1, Mounkaila, Morou1, Sani Ousman3, Maitournam Rabi2, Bachir Mayena 4, Ouédraogo Arsène1, Tohon Zilha3, Mamadou Sawadogo5 , Sangaré Lansana5 , Yassa Ndjakani1

Presenter (s): 
SIDIKOU

Outbreak of V. cholera in a rural area of Punjab, Pakistan-August 2009

Background: On August 14, 2009, District Health Authorities were informed about an increased number of acute watery diarrhea (AWD) cases in a village of Arifwala tehsil with two deaths. A team was sent to investigate the outbreak, confirm the diagnosis, identify the risk factors and recommend control measures.

Year: 
2007
Author (s): 

Rana Imtiaz Ahmed, Jamil Ahmed Ansari, Rana Jawad Asghar

Presenter (s): 
Dr. Mohammad Abbas

Institution of a rapid surveillance system controlled major Cholera epidemics in Aila flood affected Sundarban, West Bengal, India, 2009.

Background: On 25th May 2009 cyclone Aila hit Sundarban reverian area of South 24 Parganas district in west Bengal, India. It demolished 400 km river bank and resulted flood in nine coastal blocks affecting 2.5 million populations and rendering 0.87 million people homeless. About 50,000 people were rescued in 263 camps. We immediately instituted a rapid surveillance system with objectives to control diarrhea diseases, identify and prevent major outbreaks.

Year: 
2008
Author (s): 

Authors:Ajay K. Chakraborty, R. Ramachandran, M. V. Murhekar National Institute of Epidemiology, Indian Council of Medical Research, Chennai, India. Phone: +91-44-26136420 Fax: 91-44-26820464.

Presenter (s): 
Dr. Ajay Chakraborty
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