food-specific attack rates

A Cluster of Botulism Cases in Uzbekistan

Investigation of a cluster of botulism cases among guests who attended a social gathering at a home in Uzbekistan on December 31, 2003.  Straightforward outbreak investigation case study with only 24 attendees and 8 foods, but addresses botulism as a possible bioterrorism agent.

 

Objectives:

Investigation: 
Outbreak
Country: 
Uzbekistan
Year: 
2005
Author (s): 

Richard Dicker

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Botulism in Argentina

Based on an investigation of an outbreak of botulism among bus drivers in Buenos Aires in 1998.

 

Objectives:

Investigation: 
Outbreak
Country: 
Argentina
Year: 
2002
Author (s): 

Jeanette Stehr-Green

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Outbreak of Group A Pharyngitis in Louisiana

Investigation of an outbreak of Streptococcal pharyngitis traced to foodborne transmission at a school banquet. Case study requires use of Epi Info and two small data files.

 

Objectives:

Investigation: 
Outbreak
Country: 
United States
Year: 
1994
Author (s): 

Jeanette Stehr-Green and Richard Dicker

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An Outbreak of Gastroenteritis at a Hotel Banquet

 

Straightforward, thorough investigation of an outbreak among attendees of a company holiday dinner held at a hotel in Virginia in 2004. Case study addresses each of the steps of an outbreak investigation.

 

 

Investigation: 
Outbreak
Country: 
United States
Year: 
2003
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An Outbreak of Enteritis During a Pilgrimage to Mecca ("Mecca")

C. perfringens outbreak among members of the Kuwaiti medical mission during the pilgrimage to Mecca, 1979; a very straightforward outbreak investigation in a defined population with only 3 foods.

 

Objectives:

  • Define the term epidemic;
  • Create and understand the uses of a case definition;
  • Draw an epidemic curve;
  • Calculate food-specific attack rates;
  • List the steps in investigating an acute outbreak.
Investigation: 
Outbreak
Country: 
Saudi Arabia
Year: 
1980
Author (s): 

Fred Hoesly and Virgil Peavy

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An Outbreak of Gastrointestinal Illness Following a Church Supper ("Oswego")

S. aureusoutbreak among church picnic attendees, 1940; the classic,  straightforward outbreak investigation in a defined population.

Objectives:

  • Define the terms “cluster,” “outbreak,” and “epidemic;”
  • List the steps in the investigation of an outbreak;
  • Draw, interpret, and describe the value of an epidemic curve;
  • Calculate and compare food-specific attack rates to identify possible vehicles;
  • List reasons for investigating an outbreak that has apparently ended.

 

Investigation: 
Outbreak
Country: 
United States
Year: 
1940
Author (s): 

Wendell Ames, Stafford Wheeler

This case study is based on an investigationThisThis case study is based on an investigation conducted by the New York State Department of Public Health Division.  The case study was developed by Wendell Ames, MD, Stafford Wheeler, MD, and Alexander Langmuir, MD in the early 1940s.  It has been substantially updated and edited since then by Philip Brachman, Michael Gregg, and Richard Dicker, with input from the many instructors who have reviewed and taught "Oswego" as part of the EIS Summer Course each year.   case study is based on an investigation conducted by the New York State Department of Public Health Division.  The case study was developed by Wendell Ames, MD, Stafford Wheeler, MD, and Alexander Langmuir, MD in the early 1940s.  It has been substantially updated and edited since then by Philip Brachman, Michael Gregg, and Richard Dicker, with input from the many instructors who have reviewed and taught "Oswego" as part of the EIS Summer Course each year.  conducted by the New York State Department of Public Health Division.  The case study was developed by Wendell Ames, MD, Stafford Wheeler, MD, and Alexander Langmuir, MD in the early 1940s.  It has been substantially updated and edited since then by Philip Brachman, Michael Gregg, and Richard Dicker, with input from the many instructors who have reviewed and taught "Oswego" as part of the EIS Summer Course each year.  This case study is based on an investigation conducted by the New York State Department of
Public Health Division.  The case study was developed by Wendell Ames, MD, Stafford
Wheeler, MD, and Alexander Langmuir, MD in the early 1940s.  It has been substantially
updated and edited since then by Philip Brachman, Michael Gregg, and Richard Dicker, with
input from the many instructors who have reviewed and taught "Oswego" as part of the EIS
Summer Course each year.
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